Archive for November, 2008

‘Tis the Shopping Season
November 28, 2008

Advertisements

Sinking Vehicles
November 25, 2008

gm-ford-chrysler

While the “Detroit 3” are asking for a bailout from Washington, they’re being criticized for not having a plan to use the money. Not one of the three has said specifically what they would do with the cash. I guess they want us to trust that they’ll do the right thing. Well, obviously, that’s not how business works. The government only spends bailout money with strings attached. Call it twine as opposed to rope if you want, but there are strings in these deals. The sub-prime mortgage mess notwithstanding, who lends money to someone without knowing how they’re gonna get paid back? We need their business plans people!

The questions becomes: do you think it’s worth lending a hand to save some of our last great manufacturers?  Will money even do the trick?  The automakers will have to cut jobs regardless of a bailout. It’s just a matter of how many and when. Let’s remember that the government loaned Chrysler money in the late 70’s and the company paid it back with interest. Let’s also keep in mind that, GM still sells more cars globally than everyone but Toyota, if you count Toyota’s subsidiary Daihatsu. That’s promising by itself. But to truly be competitive as a company, to become attractive to shareholders, GM needs more restructuring. They have to cut costs. The work is pretty efficient. The budget is not. They’ll have to sit down with the workers’ union again. That’s gonna be a mess.

Blame bad management. Blame bad vehicles. Blame whatever you want. I would argue, the problem began when they made promises they couldn’t keep. It’s like Social Security, with the government promising a security blanket it didn’t know it wouldn’t be able to afford someday. Years ago, when no automaker could touch GM, it was easy to promise big wages and big pensions. So what now? Leave retirees out to dry? Pay the workers minimum wage? Fire everyone, liquidate in bankruptcy, and go out of business? Let their suppliers, dealers, and others who would suffer collateral damage fall? We’ll see…

Switch the Bait
November 21, 2008

So you tuned in last Friday and we looked like this…

oldseating1

…then woke up Monday to find we pulled the old ‘Bait and Switch.’

newlaurenowen

Obviously we switched chairs.  Not just us, but every anchor team at Local 2.  Why?  Because the boss likes it boy-girl-boy when the weather dudes are at the desk.  Alternating that way also works when Jennifer’s at the desk with us.  But what does that say about the sports guys?

iPhone iGlitch iNonsense
November 20, 2008

A New Jersey woman is divorcing her husband for cheating on her.  How did she catch him?  She took his iPhone and found he emailed a picture of his genitalia to another woman.  You’d think the guy was caught red-palmed.  But he had an incredible excuse.  He said the Apple store told him about a glitch in the phone that automatically attaches pictures to emails and places them in the ‘sent items’ without actually sending the message.  HAHAHAHAH!!!  Well, Wifey took that story to the Apple message boards to ask other iPhone users if they’d ever experienced that.  Our favorite response was, “Its a glitch, but only happens if the pic is sufficiently raunchy.”  Read the rest of the responses here.  And here’s where I find story originally.

The Modern Day Transplant
November 19, 2008

art_castillo

A woman has a new windpipe thanks to stem cells.  Trachea transplants are rare by themselves.  What makes this procedure special is how the replacement trachea came to be.  It’s made up three main parts: A dead person’s trachea, the patient’s stem cells, and the patient’s healthy cells from her trachea.  Scientists removed the cells from the dead person’s trachea.  That left behind a sort of scaffolding for the stem cells and healthy cells to grow.  Put it all together, give it about four days, and you’ve got a fully functional replacement trachea.  Obviously, this was not done in America because of our restrictions on stem cell research.  It was a combination of researchers and scientists from England, Spain, and Italy who pulled it off.  Read the full story here.